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Looking for a new HTML/CSS/JavaScript editor. Any suggestions?


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#1 dc2017

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 01:29

Hello,

 

I'm upgrading to a new laptop (running Windows 10 Pro) and I want to hear your suggestions for a WYSIWYG type visual editor that you use to compose your HTML/CSS/JavaScript and possibly server-side PHP?

 

I've been using DreamWeaver CS5 for years, but besides being pretty "obtuse" and buggy in many ways (plus pretty much having a very limited support for HTM5/CSS3) Adobe now wants me to pay $20-a-month subscription for a new version besides what I already paid for their CS5! So, no thank you!

 

So could anyone share your favorite HTML editor that you'd recommend?


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#2 Renaissance-Design

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 01:55

Why not take the opportunity to ditch the WYSIWYG altogether? Even the latest versions produce horrible bloated code.


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#3 dc2017

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 03:26

So what do you guys use instead of WYSIWYG? What IDE do you develop your client-side / front-end content in?


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#4 Gibson

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 03:28

I'm still with NetBeans, personally, dunno whether Renaissance still is.

 

https://netbeans.org/

 

However, something more light weight might be for example, sublime :

 

https://www.sublimetext.com/

 

And nowadays, there are many more to choose from.


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#5 Amio C

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 05:58

Have you tried Brackets or Atom? Both are great.

 

http://brackets.io/ 
https://atom.io/ 

 

Both are free and open source. Brackets is backed by Adobe. Atom is developed by GitHub.


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#6 Dizi

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 07:54

I used Dreamweaver as an editor for years, mainly because it is the first one I started using way back when.  But a few years ago decided I needed to change and after trying a few settled on Adobe's Brackets, as it is lightweight and has quite a few user built extensions meaning that it can be styled and crafted into something that works well for me. 


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#7 Lyndsey

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:26

Visual Studio Code is another good choice for a code editor: https://code.visualstudio.com/


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#8 Amio C

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:55

Visual Studio Code is another good choice

Yes, I forgot to mention that. Visual Studio Code is another good open source code editor. I personally like Brackets though.


Edited by Amio C, 01 February 2017 - 08:55.

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#9 Renaissance-Design

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 15:22

I'm still with NetBeans, personally, dunno whether Renaissance still is.

 

https://netbeans.org/

Yup. I tend to have a lot of inertia when it comes to my tools.


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#10 dc2017

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 16:17

Thank you, guys. Yep, I checked Brackets out and it looks pretty solid. I also didn't realize that Visual Studio can be used for that.


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#11 bcasey9673

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 06:06

I have done work on so many HTML editors and I find Sublime & Notepad++ the best. Working is easy on both the editors.


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#12 bljiui

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 11:23

I would like to suggest notepad++. I have been using notepad++ for 2 years it works great for me on my UI careers. 


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#13 Mila

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 15:08

I used to use Atom but switched it up to Emacs because its plugin js2-mode has everything you need for example- real time syntax check, jump to symbol, print json path, etc.  Plus i find it amaizing that it’s written in pure Lisp so you don’t need install NodeJS on windows before coding. You might want to have a look at it!


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#14 Scott

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 21:53

Another vote for Notepad++ / Brackets.


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#15 Lewwy

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 08:01

I'm an advocate for Sublime, but I also like the way Visual Studio Code is going.

 

Definitely think about dropping WYSIWYG, it'll open so many doors.


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#16 Gibson

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 15:52

I would add that I think it depends on the project. If I'm doing a PHP project, I fire up Netbeans, however, if you're doing a NodeJs project or something lightweight, perhaps Notepad++ or similar is more appropriate due to quicker start up time, less clutter and so on.

 

So I think it pays to have two. One all-in-one like NetBeans or Visual Studio, and one lightweight one like Sublime or Notepad++.

 

In other words, one IDE and one simple lightweight editor.


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#17 historygirllfc

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 17:57

So I think it pays to have two. One all-in-one like NetBeans or Visual Studio, and one lightweight one like Sublime or Notepad++.

 

In other words, one IDE and one simple lightweight editor.

 

I've really thought about that sounds like a good idea. I did dabble in Neatbeans a couple of years ago before discovering sublime and although I do occasionally use it I've switched to Atom. 'm still not sure I fully understand in the differences I know what IDE stands for but what does that actually mean? How is different to something like Atom?


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YNWA





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