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Keeping up vs Getting proficient


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#1 Gibson

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 18:46

It's a question which I think all of us ask :

 

The new developments are surely very exciting, we've had html5, SaSS, Foundation, Bootstrap, now we have Bourbon, Susy, Angular or whatever.

 

But sometimes I get a little freaked out by the speed in which these new technologies come out. Not because of unwillingness to learn them, but simply the slightly nervous feeling that whatever you learn will be out of date by the time you've learnt it.

 

Sometimes I end up having a glance at Twitter accounts by developers, and it kind of reads :

 

'Angular.js is dead. New framework out - Banana.js.'

 

'Changed my stack from Gumph.node.js.net.scgutnfinfdf incorporating a semi stack flow from remote. hjf porting through liquorice.fg and compiling using the new foghorn compiler working on a base of gruntynode.js'

 

'Excited about the new html7 developments. Html6 is dead and hasn't been born yet.'

 

'Just been to conference in Outer Mongolia. Excited about new twitty twotty Api SWAN REST interface.jp running on a Faiground.guff dicky docky console initiating jSON workflow multi ported through an asynchronous fartybollocks compiler. Makes my workflow 0.78ms faster'

 

(This is now me talking again) :

 

Currently, I'm working with trying to learn angular, Bourbon, Gulp, SaSS, and a couple of others which are really cool. There's surely some great stuff here.

 

But I bet in three months time it'll be 'Bourbon is dead', 'SaSS is dead', 'Gulp is dead' etc.

 

The importance of keeping up - sure. But what worries me is, with the speed of these new technologies arriving, does this not mean that no one really becomes truly proficient in anything? Everything is learnt just a 'little bit' and then ditched for the new one, which is learnt 'just a little bit' and so on and so on?

 

How do you guys get round this? It seems that more time is spent learning the new *Insert cutesie framework name here*.JS than is actually spent building anything with these things. How do these devs do it? Do they actually count the learning as part of their working day?

 

Or is the skill in deciding which of these technologies will actually stick around longer than about six months before being superceded by something else?

 

Must be frustrating for a quantum physicist dedicating their life to it only to discover that 'Nah, quantum is dead. String theory is the new thing' or 'Nah string theory is dead, M-Theory is the new thing'.

 

How do you guys tackle this so you're not spending seven and a half hours a day learning new stuff, and only half an hour actually doing any work with it? If you see what I mean. We're all in the same boat I guess.

 

Surely these Twitter guys can't be putting in an eight hour work day, then ALSO spending time learning all the new stuff - they must not have time for anything else at all.

 

Or is it, indeed, that they are actually 'posing' on Twitter, for example, a bit like fashion victims, proving how cutting-edge they are?

 

I can't work out where they get the time...


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#2 Notbanksys Copy Shoppe

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 09:40

AAH Bisto is the only way forward imo.

 

Or is it, indeed, that they are actually 'posing' on Twitter, for example, a bit like fashion victims, proving how cutting-edge they are?

 

Well over 90% this. I'm sure there are some prototype cyborgs out there who can learn this stuff as it arrives, use it, and still keep up with everything else, but they probably can't get a girlfriend, so, swings and roundabouts.

 

This thread basically describes one of the main reasons I ditched tech and focused on words :P 


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#3 ryan

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 09:54

I think most importantly, get the core knowledge up to scratch.

 

My biggest problem is working with about 5 different languages, and I found myself not utilising HTML5, just because I haven't actually sat down and read the docs.

 

I would say, realistically, core knowledge of the language, and then research tools that might help your workflow. For me, that's just the following tools:

 

  • SASS
  • Gulp
  • Foundation (but could be Susy, Bootstrap, whatever you prefer), just makes it easier rather than coding things like buttons etc from scratch every time. Foundation 6 has cut down in size too, so becoming less and less bloated now.

Don't get too caught up with the tools, though CSS preprocessors, and task runners are here to stay.


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#4 MikeChipshop

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 10:15

I find it's about biding time and waiting it out to see which ones actually are useful and stand the test of time. I did this with Git originally, and when it became obvious that it was tool that was going to be extremely useful, plus supported for a long time, then i stuck my toes in and got git wet.

 

The issue i have with a lot of these tools is they solve a problem that's not a problem. Many shave .3 seconds of a task but then when it fucks up, they add half a day to that routine.
When it comes to frameworks, most are bloated beyond belief and if you had your work analysed by a peer, they'd tell you as such.

 

It's the trade off at the end of the day really. For example, i use jQ instead of vanilla JS because it does save me time and isn;t going any where soon. I don't use things like foundation because they simply aren't in my work flow and has been proven recently with the release of Foundation 6, they will change. I have enough trouble keeping caught up with the actual corner stones of our industry, namely HTML/CSS and i really don't have the time to add more and more fashionable things to that list.

 

By all means, people can use what they want, but don't preach it FFS because that makes you no better than any other militant religion.


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#5 ryan

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 10:18

got git wet.
  :spiteful:
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#6 MikeChipshop

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 10:48

  :spiteful:

 

I like to get my little Git a little wet from time to time.


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#7 Paul_likes_the_ocean

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 12:29

This thread basically describes one of the main reasons I ditched tech and focused on words photos  :P

Amended for my purposes


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#8 brightonmike

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 12:38

One important point to mention is a lot of these tools, methodologies and ideas are mostly useful for larger scale projects and development teams of several to dozens of people.

 

When you have 45 developers working on a massive code base, they can help, and that can be quite dramatic. Those benefits scaled down for 1 developer are less noticeable.

 

For example, PostCSS is being bandied around like nuts at the moment as a new alternative to Sass. It's a bit more flexible, it's a bit faster, it's a bit more powerful - whatever. For now though I'm ignoring it. I frankly haven't got time to learn it, and because I develop mostly alone on smaller scale projects, it's benefits are likely not all that much. I highly doubt I will ever use it at all.

 

I get this frustration too...but then I remind myself of this point.

 

These tools often exist to solve fairly specific problems for fairly specific scenarios. If you're not finding problems with your workflow or your development then I just wouldn't worry about it.

 

That said - I'd always encourage devs to do a bit of reading here and there, be semi-aware of what's going on, and to sometimes give something new a try.


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#9 Renaissance-Design

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 14:13

Well, who'd have thunk it? An industry known for Apple domination also seems to be populated largely by sneering tech hipsters. Hold the front page.

 

Seriously though, just keep trucking on, and stick with HTML9 Responsive Boilerstrap JS.


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#10 Dark Knight

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 00:51

So with all that is being discussed, would you say you are potentially digging yourself an early grave if you were to advertise yourself as a one man "freelance web designer" Has that now become to big of a role for one person to fill.
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#11 TheLonelyPixel

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 08:40

So with all that is being discussed, would you say you are potentially digging yourself an early grave if you were to advertise yourself as a one man "freelance web designer" Has that now become to big of a role for one person to fill.

Not at all, If you're a freelancer you just pick and choose the tools that appeal most to you and that help you speed up your workflow, if you're an employee, learning all these tools won't do you any harm when it comes to interviewing for new positions.

 

Obviously you shouldn't spread yourself too thin and try to learn too much too quickly because you'll be shooting yourself in the foot


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#12 MikeChipshop

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 08:48

That said - I'd always encourage devs to do a bit of reading here and there, be semi-aware of what's going on, and to sometimes give something new a try.

 

That's the the perfect take away from all this. There's a huge difference between mastering something, and understanding it and it's place in a work flow.

I also always joke with brightonmike about using Gruntaliciousboilerplateraubergine, but it is a joke, i personally understand what these tools do, i just choose not to use them. 
Actually going out of your way to avoid them is commercial suicide.

 

So with all that is being discussed, would you say you are potentially digging yourself an early grave if you were to advertise yourself as a one man "freelance web designer" Has that now become to big of a role for one person to fill.

 

Nope. It's really no different to what it's ever been. If you have holes in your knowledge, you plug them with the knowledge of those around you. This business is the same as any other, it pays to network with others in the same field.

 

It does raise an interesting point on the evolution of the one man team, i mean, are any of us really a one man team any more?


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#13 brightonmike

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 12:49

It does raise an interesting point on the evolution of the one man team, i mean, are any of us really a one man team any more?

 

 

If you use anything third-party, you are not a one man band.


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#14 Scott

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 15:15

Well, who'd have thunk it? An industry known for Apple domination also seems to be populated largely by sneering tech hipsters. Hold the front page.

 

QFTFW


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#15 aditya12

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 13:04

very nice tutorial here programming tutorial https://www.welookups.com

 

http://www.javacodegeeks.net


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