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What is the general "web design process" ?


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#1 MB-1992

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 19:32

Hey,

 

I'll get straight to the point here and ask; what is the general web design process?

I have been searching google for answers as to the steps that need to be taken (from start to finish) to produce a website for a client.

 

From what I understand, the initial steps involve gathering the website requirements, researching, and gathering content. I get this. You need to know what the purpose of the website is, who the intended audience is etc.

Where I am coming up a little stuck is the actual 'design' phase.

 

Do I sketch (on paper) a mockup version first? Or is it more beneficial to use an online resource for this?

Do I go on to photoshop and design the whole website on that first, and then go from there into my text editor?

 

I also feel slightly confused as to what 'wireframing' actually means. Is it just a mockup version of the website? Is it just the basic layout of the website without any colour, images etc? Just the structure?

 

I would be interested to know what everyones thoughts are on this, and would greatly appreciate any responses.

 

Thanks.


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#2 Dizi

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:23

Your process is something that you develop over time, there is no right or wrong way to do it.
 
Wireframing a site is sort of like a blueprint, it is the structure of the site built out as a line drawing with boxes to indicate things like where an image, logo or text will be placed.
 
Once all the information has been gathered for a site I go into Photoshop and start playing about with the layout of the site in there, as I find it easier to visualise the site if I'm playing with blocks and colours while figuring out the structure. However another designer where I work likes to sketch out wireframes in a notebook first so that they get the structure how they would like it before opening Photoshop.
 
There was even a debate a while ago, which is probably still ongoing, that the best way to design a website is to go straight into coding the site instead of creating flat mockups for a client. Personally I disagree with this idea, but again if it works for those designers then it isn't the wrong way to work, just a different way to how I would do it.

Edited by Dizi, 01 February 2017 - 08:37.

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#3 MB-1992

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 21:39

 

Your process is something that you develop over time, there is no right or wrong way to do it.
 
Wireframing a site is sort of like a blueprint, it is the structure of the site built out as a line drawing with boxes to indicate things like where an image, logo or text will be placed.
 
Once all the information has been gathered for a site I go into Photoshop and start playing about with the layout of the site in there, as I find it easier to visualise the site if I'm playing with blocks and colours while figuring out the structure. However another designer where I work likes to sketch out wireframes in a notebook first so that they get the structure how they would like it before opening Photoshop.
 
There was even a debate a while ago, which is probably still ongoing, that the best way to design a website is to go straight into coding the site instead of creating flat mockups for a client. Personally I disagree with this idea, but again if it works for those designers then it isn't the wrong way to work, just a different way to how I would do it.

 

Hey,

 

Thanks for your reply.

So I guess then it really is just down to personal preference and what way suits you. I had a shot with an online wireframing app and seem to prefer that over sketching by hand. It just seems easier and quicker to move things around and edit as I go along.

 

I suppose that I will have to try both ways; using photoshop and going straight into the coding. Then I can see what fits best for me.

 

Another question I have is in regards to software. What software do you believe a web designer should have? I was going to buy photoshop since a lot of designer use that, but then I also seen that photoshop elements could be useful for a beginner. So I am undecided as of yet on which to purchase.


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#4 Gibson

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 23:48

1 : Get brief from client.

2 : Perform brief to client's specifications.

3 : Get project creep from client. "Shouldn't take you long".

4 : Perform project creep for client.

 

Repeat steps 3 and 4 ad nauseum...


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#5 Dizi

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 19:42

Another question I have is in regards to software. What software do you believe a web designer should have? I was going to buy photoshop since a lot of designer use that, but then I also seen that photoshop elements could be useful for a beginner. So I am undecided as of yet on which to purchase.

 

Again it is down to preference, Photoshop is a good tool and something that I use but that doesn't mean that it is a must have.  I haven't used PS Elements so I can't comment on if it is good for beginners.  Gimp is quite a good bit of software plus its free so it costs nothing to try it.  I've also heard good things about Sketch, but again I've not used it myself so can only go off what people have told me.  


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#6 shubham1

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 12:40

  1. Step 1: Client's needs. Before starting your plan, you'll need as much information from your client as possible. ...
  2. Step 2: Research, ideas & sketch. This step is always the hardest. ...
  3. Step 3: Wireframes. Wireframes are the blueprint of your website. ...
  4. Step 4: Style tiles. ...
  5. Step 5: Prototype.
  6.  

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#7 AlbertDavid

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 08:26

Glad you got your answer. It does come down to personal preference. Some people remember things well, are good at visualizing and with expertise, they directly start working on the code. Whereas some prefer to have a wire frame, set the design, create a mock up to actually see what the end product would look like and then work on it. As Dizi has pointed out, it's a personal opinion. So you need to try everything and find which works for you.


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#8 SukhwinderSingh

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 15:49

Glad you got your answer. It does come down to personal preference. Some people remember things well, are good at visualizing and with expertise, they directly start working on the code. Whereas some prefer to have a wire frame, set the design, create a mock up to actually see what the end product would look like and then work on it. As Dizi has pointed out, it's a personal opinion. So you need to try everything and find which works for you.

 

I am glad you got your answer.  There is nothing left to explain. 


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